Conference Sessions
Life Sciences: Applications (LSA)

LSA.1: Label-free Life Science Imaging

Label-free imaging refers to optical measurements performed on biological samples without the need for labeling agents. Phase contrast and differential interference contrast microscopy are simple optical approaches to label free imaging based on refractive properties of the sample. More powerful approaches generate image contrast based on properties of the sample such as its ability to delay light interacting with the sample due to refractive index changes, or the ability of the sample to create unique spectroscopic, auto-fluorescence, birefringence, or acoustic signatures. Label-free approaches are often used to image delicate primary samples in order to study the dynamics of proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis and cell migration. Recent advances in label-free imaging include ptychography and quantitative phase contrast microscopy. More broadly speaking, label-free imaging approaches include pre-clincial methods such as micro-CT and MRI. All advances in these or similar methods are welcome in this session.

Related Conference Theme/s: Phase Sensitive Methods with Photons and Electrons

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • TIM SELF (UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM, UK)

      Tim Self is a Chief Experimental Officer and Head of the Imaging facility at the School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham. His interest and passion for microscopy started in his undergraduate project using electron microscopy at the University of Sheffield and has spent the proceeding 35 years putting that passion into practice. For half of his career Tim has applied electron microscopy to many biological research questions until in 2000 he saw the light and moved over full time to light microscopy. He now runs a large core facility with EM, histology, super resolution, confocal, wide field, High Content, FCS and TIRF imaging at the University of Nottingham.

       

    • KURT ANDERSON (THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE, UK)

        Kurt I. Anderson is a cell biologist who uses advanced imaging methods to study cell migration, primarily in the context of cancer. He completed his PhD in 1997 under the guidance of Vic Small at the University of Salzburg on the actin-based mechanism of fish keratocyte migration. He then spent 2 years as a post-doc at the Marie Curie Cancer Research Institute (UK) with Rob Cross imaging the dynamics of cell adhesion. In 2001 he moved to Dresden to set up the light microscopy facility at the new Max Planck Institute for Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG). In 2005 Kurt moved to the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research in Glasgow, where he set up the Beatson Advanced Imaging Resource (BAIR) and ran a research group investigating tumor cell migration. His group pioneered the use of imaging methods such as FRAP and FRET to study the molecular dynamics of cell adhesion and migration in vitro and in vivo. He became a Professor of Cell Migration at the University of Glasgow in 2011, and was awarded the first Royal Microscopical Society Medal for Life Sciences in 2012. In March 2016 he was appointed “CALM Head” at the Francis Crick Institute in London. Kurt is passionate about imaging and a sucker for a start-up.

  • Invited Speakers
    • PAOLA BORRI (CARDIFF UNIVERSITY, UK)

      Talk Title: Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy: Technology developments and biological applications

      Professor Paola Borri is a physicist whose major interest is in the interaction of light with matter in the coherent regime, as a tool to understand the fundamental optical properties of nanostructures and for novel applications in the life sciences. She was awarded an MSc (1993) and Ph.D degree (1997) in Physics from the University of Florence (Italy). From 1997 to 1999 she was Assistant Research Professor at the Technical University of Denmark (Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark). From 1999 to 2004 she worked as Senior Scientist and EU Marie Curie Fellow (2001-2003) at the Physics Department of Dortmund University in Germany where she was awarded the Habilitation degree in Physics (Venia Legendi) in 2003. From September 2004 she moved to Cardiff University to establish a new cross-disciplinary activity in the area of biophotonics, with a focus on label-free Coherent Raman Scattering microscopy for the life sciences. On August 2011 she was promoted to a Personal Chair. Paola Borri received the Marie Curie Excellence Award from the European Commission in November 2006. She was awarded a highly competitive EPSRC Leadership Fellowship (2010-2015), and since 2015 she is Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales and Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award holder.

    • RADIM CHMELIK (CENTRAL EUROPEAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, CZ)

      Talk Title: hiQPI: Holographic Incoherent Quantitative Phase Imaging

      Professor Radim Chmelik studied physics at Masaryk University Brno and in 1997 received his PhD in Physical and Materials Engineering from Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic) under Professor Jiri Komrska for the theoretical description of focusing by diffractive lenses. As a postdoc he studied methods of 3D imaging in light microscopy. This led him to incoherent holography approaches. In the late ninetieth he and Professor Zdenek Harna built the first holographic microscope capable of working with completely incoherent illumination. He then continued to investigate these techniques as modalities of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) and (since 2007) also their applications in cell biology together with Dr. Pavel Vesely. In 2012, Radim Chmelik has become a head of the Experimental Biophotonics research group at CEITEC, Brno.  Within the field of advanced light microscopies his group focuses on progress of Holographic Incoherent QPI (hiQPI) both in the development and applications. Coherence effects are studied with the aim to develop hiQPI of 3D specimens and improve imaging in turbid media. Novel techniques and image processing methods are applied for non-invasive analysis of live cell behavior.  Based on live-cell dry-mass profiling the responses to therapeutic challenges constitute the strategy for development of personalized cancer treatment. Radim Chmelik recently received the Czech Brains award in the invention prize category.


LSA. 2: Dynamic Interactions in Cells, Organoids, Tissue and Entire Organisms

Temporal imaging is necessary to reveal and measure the complex dynamic information of biological systems during development, homeostasis and disease. In this session we will focus on the use of live imaging; from 2 and 3-dimensional cell cultures to intravital and lightsheet microscopy. Particular focus will be on the capacity to examine multiple processes simultaneously, such as: multiscale, multi- molecular or correlative imaging. Among topics that we will cover are the recent advances in the field of imaging host-pathogens interactions in deep living tissues and cell and tissue differentiation during development. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved during cellular interactions through intra vital imaging can help the development and targeting of therapies to particular diseases. 

Related Conference Theme/s: The Lab in the Microscope – In Situ, In Vivo, In Operando and Multimodal Microscopy

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • LAURENT GELMAN (FRIEDRICH MIESCHER INSTITUTE FOR BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, CH)

      Laurent obtained a PhD in Molecular Biology from the Institute Pasteur in Lille and the University of Strasbourg in 2000 and worked further as a Post-Doc at the IGBMC in Strasbourg on in vitro transcription systems. He then moved in 2002 to the University of Lausanne to study gene regulation in living cells using emerging microscopy technologies such as FRAP, FRET and FCS. Laurent joined the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel in 2006 and since 2010 is co-head of the Facility for Advanced Imaging and Microscopy where he is in charge of light microscopy and related image processing projects.

  • Invited Speakers
    • PRISCA LIBERALI (FRIEDRICH MIESCHER INSTITUTE FOR BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH, CH)

      Talk Title: Imaging Organoid Development

      Prisca Liberali has been trained as physical organic chemist with a focus on physical organic chemical reactions. During her postdoc, she developed new experimental single-cell methods and statistical approaches to analyse and model cell-to-cell variability and its involvement in the emergence of complex cellular populations. Currently, she is an assistant professor at the University of Basel and at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) with a laboratory focused on dynamics of self-organization and on how cellular signalling dictates its spatial-temporal regulation. To address this in a fully tractable experimental model system that mimics conditions of tissue formation in organisms, her laboratory uses stem cells derived organoids and gastruloids. As these emergent systems have multiple layers of biological organization at different scales, her laboratory is developing novel image-based experimental, and statistical methods to increase our integrated understanding of single-cell biology. Prisca Liberali has received several research awards, including an ERC Starting Grant (2018-2022) and a SNSF Professorship Grant (2015-2021).

    • MATTHIAS GUNZER (CENTER OF MEDICAL BIOTECHNOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF DUISBURG-ESSEN, DE)

      Talk Title: TBC







       


LSA.3: Applications for Imaging Sub-Cellular Events at High Resolution

Recent developments include improvement in the speed of acquisition, tracking the trajectories of single molecules while imaging, high-throughput approaches and development of new probes. Emphasis of the session will be on the applications of various super-resolution techniques and light sheet microscopy at sub-cellular level.

Related Conference Theme/s: The Lab in the Microscope – In Situ, In Vivo, In Operando and Multimodal Microscopy

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • PAULA SAMPAIO (UNIVERSITY OF PORTO, PT)






       

       

    • MERJA JOENSUU (QUEENSLAND BRAIN INSTITUTE, AU)

      Merja Joensuu is an ARC DECRA Fellow at the Single Molecule Neuroscience Laboratory at the Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia, Queensland Brain institute, the University of Queensland. She obtained her PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Helsinki, Finland in 2014 using electron microscopy and live cell imaging as her main techniques. Her current research focuses on the molecular mechanism of presynaptic membrane trafficking and neurotransmission, axonal retrograde transport, and development of super-resolution microscopy techniques. Her DECRA project aims to reveal a novel role for saturated fatty acids in learning and memory.

  • Invited Speakers
    • ERDINC SEZGIN (SCILIFELAB, KAROLINSKA INSTITUTET, SE)

      Talk Title: Super-resolving cell membrane dynamics

      Erdinc Sezgin is a Group Leader at the SciLifeLab, Karolinska Institutet. He got his PhD from the International Max Planck Research School in Dresden, in the group of Petra Schwille, followed by a short postdoc in Kai Simons group. Later, he moved to Christian Eggeling Lab at University of Oxford where he studied immune signalling with super-resolution imaging. His “Cell Signalling, Immunity and Nanoimaging (CSI:Nano)” lab at SciLifeLab focuses on elucidating the molecular details of immune cell signalling by using advanced imaging and synthetic biology tools.

    • TILL STEPHAN (Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, DE)

      Talk Title: Super-resolution microscopy of the mitochondrial inner membrane

      I received a master´s degree after studying biochemistry in Hannover, Germany, from 2010-2015. Since 2016, I am a PhD student at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen, Germany. I am working in the research group “mitochondrial structure and dynamics” (Prof. Stefan Jakobs). Using super-resolution light microscopy and electron microscopy, I investigate the mechanisms that regulate the inner membrane architecture of mitochondria. I expect receiving my doctoral degree in the course of 2020.


LSA.4: Applications of AFM in Geological and Biological Context

Using AFM in a geological, biological and material context can provide answers to topics ranging from the origin of life, to decipher the processes for mineral nucleation and growth, to quantify forces between organic molecules or organic molecules and surfaces as well as protein recognition studies. Recent years have seen an advance in biologic applications of the AFM and self-assembly of organic compounds on different substrates, how bacteria interact with different surfaces, how cells responds to nanoparticles used for drug delivery or the crystal structure of photosynthetic membranes are being addressed. Video rate AFM is increasingly used to study the dynamic behaviour of macromolecules in contact with other compounds or surfaces. There has also been an increase in number of AFM derived techniques enabling a more comprehensive characterization of physical and chemical properties of surfaces.

We welcome contributions on all aspects of AFM including imaging techniques, physical and chemical characterization and quantification of bond parameters using dynamic force spectroscopy. We encourage contributions describing the fundamental processes and mechanisms in geological, biological and material sciences as well as applied studies in e.g. geochemistry, mineralogy, polymer chemistry, cell biology, molecular engineering, tribology etc. The common ground for the session is the use of a inorganic or organic substrate in some form and both purely inorganic systems and bio-mineral systems are of interest.

Related Conference Theme/s: The Lab in the Microscope – In Situ, In Vivo, In Operando and Multimodal Microscopy

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • STANISLAV JELAVIC (UNIVERSITY OF COPENHAGEN, DK)

      Stanislav Jelavic is the Postdoctoral Researcher at the Section for GeoGenetics, Globe Institute, University of Copenhagen. He is focused on understanding the fundamental forces between DNA, bacteria and mineral surfaces. Specifically, he measures the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters determining the strenght of binding between DNA and minerals, and he determines the kinetics of DNA uptake by bacteria and the subsequent rate of horizontal gene transfer. His goal is to unravel the relationship between the DNA-mineral binding and the rate of gene propagation through bacterial communities, which will ultimately help us predict the propagation of antibiotic resistant genes in the environment and mitigate its harmful effects. Stan obtained his Master’s degree in Mineralogy and Petrography from University of Zagreb, Croatia and a Joint Erasmus Mundus Master’s degree in Material Science from University of Poitiers, France, and University of Aveiro, Portugal. He obtained his PhD at the Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, where he was determining the composition of the interfacial region between inorganic and organic phases. At his first postdoctoral appointment at the Deparment of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Stan was measuring the nanoscale composition of graphite and graphene oxides.

    • KARINA K.SAND (ABERYSTWYTH UNIVERSITY, UK)









       

  • Invited Speakers

 


LSA.5: Metabolic and Large Scale Imaging

Advances in modern microscopy techniques such as light sheet, super-resolution or cryoelectron microscopy create significant data stream. This session will present examples of microscopy-based projects that not only facilitate the state-of-the-art high-resolution imaging of organs and whole organisms but also provide tools to integrate large scale data into image processing pipelines. Specifically, the session introduces how to reconstruct large three dimensional (3D) images of cleared and expanded biological samples imaged by the light sheet microscopy using a novel tool - BigStitcher. It will also feature the newest interdisciplinary approaches to image the entire development of embryos at a single cell level using a combination of quantitative image processing and multi-view light sheet microscopy. The overall goal of the session is to introduce the latest top-notch research in the field of large-data microscopy leading to the future of smart microscopes.

Related Conference Theme/s: Cutting Edge Advanced Sample Preparation

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • JAKUB SEDZINSKI (NNF CENTER FOR STEM CELL BIOLOGY, DK)






       

       

    • JONATHAN BREWER (SOUTH DENMARK UNIVERSITY, DK) ​​​​​​​

      Jonathan Brewer is an associate professor at the University of Southern Denmark. Here he holds the position of Head of Section for Bioimaging and is the Director for the Danish Molecular Biomedical Imaging Center (DaMBIC). His work is focused on the use of advanced Bioimaging techniques to answer fundamental questions in biological systems and is internationally recognized for performing advanced studies in bio-imaging of skin. Using a unique combination of diffusion measurements together with super resolution microscopy and coherent anti stokes raman scattering (CARS) microscopy JB has worked towards understanding the structure and dynamics of the human skin barrier. In collaboration with Odense University Hospital JB has initiated using multimodal imaging including CARS and second harmonic generation as a tool for fast head and neck cancer diagnostics. DaMBIC: JB has been one of the driving forces behind developing the Danish Molecular Biomedical Imaging Center (DaMBIC), into an imaging facility of a high international standard. DaMBIC hosts several state of the art Bioimaging techniques which are unique in Denmark. He also recently was one of the cofounders of the Danish Bioimaging Network.

  • Invited Speakers
    • STEPHAN PREIBISCH (MAX DELBRUECK CENTER FOR MOLECULAR MEDICINE, DE)

      Talk Title: TBC

      Stephan Preibisch received his master of computer science from the Technical University of Dresden in 2006. During his computer science studies, he was working at the Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics in Leipzig developing the 'Hook'-algorithm for the correction of microarray data. He did his PhD at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics in Dresden where he designed solutions for the reconstruction of lightsheet microscopy data, and co-developed the image processing library ImgLib2, and the well-known Fiji software. During his time as bioinformatics specialist at Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Janelia Research Campus in Ashburn, VA, USA and HFSP fellow at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York he studied the C. elegans dauer exit using a combination of experimental and computational methods as well as in-toto electron microscopy. He further developed novel methods for lightsheet deconvolution and multi-focal microscopy reconstruction. The Preibisch laboratory at the Berlin Institute of Medical Systems Biology of the Max Delbrück Center focused on the reconstruction of lightsheet microscopy acquisitions of large cleared and expanded samples, as well as the study of mechanisms of gene regulation using single-molecule RNA imaging and image processing. Dr. Preibisch is deeply involved in the Helmholtz Imaging Platform, a cross-institutional, cross-domain effort by the Helmholtz Society to solve challenges in image analysis. Currently, he is team leader at the HHMI Janelia Research Campus in Ashburn, Virginia where he develops computational methods for image analysis.


LSA.6: Applications of Correlative Microscopy of Biological Systems

Correlative microscopy is a growing family of techniques that combine, on one sample, a sequence of various imaging modalities, enabling structure-function analysis in the life sciences.  This session will focus on examples of ground-breaking applications in biology, and at the same time covering the range of methodological implementations used on the various model systems. We welcome contributions that reveal new biology from correlation of any of the following imaging modalities (but not restricted to): fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, cryo-EM, volume EM, micro-CT, soft X-ray, AFM, and sub-cellular stable isotope and molecular mapping using NanoSIMS and TOF-SIMS.

Related Conference Theme/s: The Lab in the Microscope – In Situ, In Vivo, In Operando and Multimodal Microscopy

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • LUCY COLLINSON (THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE, UK)

      Lucy Collinson leads the Electron Microscopy Science Technology Platform (EM STP) at The Francis Crick Institute in London. She has a degree and PhD in Medical Microbiology, and post-doctoral research investigating membrane trafficking pathways in lysosome-related organelles. She has 15 years’ experience running biological EM facilities, at UCL, the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, and then at the new Francis Crick Institute since 2015. With a team of 10 electron microscopists and 3 physicists, she oversees more than 120 research projects with more than 60 research groups within the Crick, imaging across scales from proteins to whole organisms. Her technology development interests include volume EM, correlative imaging techniques, cryo-microscopy, X-ray microscopy, image analysis, citizen science and microscope design and prototyping.

    • LOUISE HELENE SØGAARD JENSEN (EPFL, UK)

       







       

  • Invited Speakers
    • MAXIMILIANO GUTIERREZ (THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE, UK)

      Talk Title: Correlative light electron ion microscopy: visualising antibiotics at the sub-cellular level

      Max is a cell biologist originally from Mendoza, Argentina. In 2005, he obtained a PhD in cell biology from the University of San Luis, Argentina. During his PhD work, he discovered a novel innate immune pathway, later named “Xenophagy”. In 2006, he moved to EMBL in Heidelberg, Germany as a postdoc in Gareth Griffiths Laboratory, first as a fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and then as an EMBO fellow. His work in Heidelberg focused on the cell biology and imaging of macrophages; it was also in Heidelberg that he felt in love with Electron Microscopy.In 2009, he started his independent research group at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig, Germany as head of the Junior Research Group 'Phagosome Biology'. In 2012, he was recruited as a Programme Leader Track at the Medical Research Council's National Institute for Medical Research, which became part of the Francis Crick Institute in 2015. Since 2018, he is a Senior Group Leader at the Francis Crick Institute.

    • NICULINA MUSAT (HELMHOLTZ CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, DE)

      Talk Title: TBC







       

 


LSA.7: Pathology, Immunocytochemistry and Biomolecular Labelling

This session focuses on electron and/or light microscopy approaches for the  localization of biomolecules in cells and tissues. In particular  new biomolecular labelling approaches as well as immunocytochemistry in relation to pathological conditions will be emphasized. Oral or poster contributions dealing with new methodological concepts, as well as with new types of probes, are of particular interest.

Related Conference Theme/s: Cutting Edge Advanced Sample Preparation

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • ANDREAS BRECH (UNIVERSITY OF OSLO)






       

       

    • JANA NEBESÁŘOVÁ (CZECK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES)

      Jana Nebesarova has been leading the Laboratory of Electron Microscopy at Biology Centre of Czech Academy of Sciences in České Budejovice, Czech Republic, since 1991. She has gained considerable experience in biological specimen preparation for electron microscopy and evaluation of cellular ultrastructure. In her own research, she focuses on finding new applications of low voltage electron microscopy in the examination of biological samples, new markers for immunolabeling in 3D electron microscopy and new methods of specimen preparation for SBF SEM. 

  • Invited Speakers
    • WIEBKE MÖBIUS (MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, DE)

      Talk Title: Localization techniques in biomedical electron microscopy: good as gold

      Wiebke Möbius studied biology at the University of Göttingen and Bonn (Germany) and received her Diploma in 1994. She then obtained her PhD at the University of Bonn in 1998 by investigating the intracellular transport of glycosphingolipids by electron microscopy. She then worked as a postdoctoral researcher in Utrecht (The Netherlands) in the group of Prof. Geuze and Slot until 2003. She spent another year as postdoctoral researcher at the EMBL (Heidelberg, Germany) before she moved to Göttingen in 2004 to take over the Electron Microscopy Core Unit of the Max-Planck-Institute of Experimental Medicine. Since then she works there as research associate studying myelin biology. In this context cryopreparation methods as well as 3D imaging using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and immunoelectron microscopy are applied.

    • PAVEL HOZÁK (INSTITUTE OF MOLECULAR GENETICS, CAS, CZ)

      Talk Title: TBC







       


LSA.8: Imaging Self Eating - Autophagy under the Microscope

Autophagy is a life-supporting catabolic process conserved from yeast to man. It was originally described using electron microscopy, soon after the first electron microscopes became available for researchers. Genes and proteins regulating autophagy were discovered in the 1990ies and these findings were awarded with a Nobel prize to Yoshinori Ohsumi in 2016. The knowledge on autophagy proteins has made it possible to image this process in live cells and to combine live cell imaging with other cutting-edge microscopy methods including super resolution, electron tomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy. Imaging has brought autophagy field forward more than any other methodology, with the exception of yeast genetics that revealed the identity of autophagy genes. We aim to invite the world leaders on autophagy research to demonstrate how different types of imaging technologies are applied in their work. The approaches are likely to include live-cell imaging, super resolution, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, electron tomography and immuno electron microscopy.

Related Conference Theme/s: The Lab in the Microscope – In Situ, In Vivo, In Operando and Multimodal Microscopy

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • EEVA-LIISA ESKELINEN (UNIVERSITY OF TURKU, FI)

      Eeva-Liisa Eskelinen has a long track record in autophagy field, in particular, in elucidating the fine structure and membrane dynamics of autophagosome formation using three-dimensional electron microscopy. She completed her PhD at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. After that, she worked as postdoctoral researcher in Göttingen, Germany, and Helsinki, Finland, and then moved to Dundee, Scotland, where she worked as an independent investigator. From Scotland she moved to Kiel, Germany to work as a group leader at the Biochemical Institute. During 2005-2017 she worked as a group leader and University Lecturer at the Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki. Since November 2017 she is a professor in medical cell biology at the Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Finland.

    • NICHOLAS KTISTAKIS (BABRAHAM INSTITUTE, CAMRDIGE, UK)

      Nicholas Ktistakis has been a group leader at the Signalling Programme of the Babraham Institute since 1996. He studies lipid signalling, with special emphasis on pathways regulated by phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. In recent years his lab discovered omegasomes as platforms for generating autophagosomes during non-selective and selective autophagy, and he has also studied the dynamics of mTOR activation in response to amino acids. Prior to coming to the UK, Dr Ktistakis worked as a post-doc and Instructor at the Biochemistry Department of UT Soutwestern Medical Center in Dallas with Dr Michael Roth, studying signals that direct proteins to different cellular compartments. His work is funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

  • Invited Speakers
    • LUCY COLLINSON (THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE, UK)

      Talk Title: TBC

      Lucy Collinson leads the Electron Microscopy Science Technology Platform (EM STP) at The Francis Crick Institute in London. She has a degree and PhD in Medical Microbiology, and post-doctoral research investigating membrane trafficking pathways in lysosome-related organelles. She has 15 years’ experience running biological EM facilities, at UCL, the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, and then at the new Francis Crick Institute since 2015. With a team of 10 electron microscopists and 3 physicists, she oversees more than 120 research projects with more than 60 research groups within the Crick, imaging across scales from proteins to whole organisms. Her technology development interests include volume EM, correlative imaging techniques, cryo-microscopy, X-ray microscopy, image analysis, citizen science and microscope design and prototyping.

    • MURIEL MARI (UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTRE GROENINGEN, NL)

      Talk Title: Electron microscopy methodologies for the ultrastructural analysis of yeast S. cerevisiae, and their application to the study of autophagy

      Muriel Mari studied Biochemistry and Cell Biology at the University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France. In 2002, she obtained her PhD in Cell Biology and Physiology from the same Institution, in the laboratory of Dr. Yannick Lemarchand-Brustel, where she works on intracellular trafficking of the glucose transporter in the adipose tissue. In 2003, she joined the Department of Cell Biology at the University Medical Center Utrecht (The Netherlands) to get specialized in advanced electron microscopy methods. There, as a Marie-Curie postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Prof. Hans Geuze, she investigated the intracellular transport of lysosomal enzyme receptors in mammalian cells. She entered the autophagy field in 2006, when she joined the group of Prof. Fulvio Reggiori for an additional postdoctoral experience in Utrecht and started investigating on the molecular mechanism of autophagy using yeast as a model system. In 2015,  Muriel Mari was appointed as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Biomedical Sciences of Cells and Systems of the University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands. She is currently studying autophagosome biogenesis in yeast and mammalian cells at the ultrastructural level using techniques such as high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution, electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy, electron tomography and correlative light and electron microscopy.


LSA.9: Applications of Volume Scanning Electron Microscopy in Life Sciences

Volume SEM is a family of imaging techniques that enable automated acquisition of series of cross-sections through a specimen. They include focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM), serial block face SEM (SBEM) and array tomography (AT). Aiming at imaging large volumes, they impressively bridge scales from tissues morphology to subcellular architecture. Session will cover applications from all areas of life sciences, ranging from neurobiology to all model organisms and from cell organelles to entire organisms.

Related Conference Theme/s: Cutting Edge Advanced Sample Preparation

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
  • Invited Speakers
    • TOBIAS STARBORG (UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER, UK)

      Talk Title: Serial Block Face SEM: Cutting edge technology, or volume imaging for the masses?

      Toby Starborg is a senior experimental officer at the University of Manchester, where he specialises in three-dimensional imaging techniques in the nanometre to micrometre scale.  Within the Wellcome Centre his work focuses on extra cellular matrix architecture, organisation and its interactions with cells, mainly using serial block face imaging and electron tomography.  His work developing serial block face imaging capabilities at Manchester University has given him experience imaging a large variety of biological samples from whole tissues through to dispersed parasitic organisms. Toby’s imaging career started during his PhD, where he used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to map mass variation along individually dispersed collagen fibrils.  In the early 2000s he moved to using serial section TEM to examine matrix organisation during tendon development, and complemented this with serial section electron tomography to examine the cell-matrix interface in more detail.  The experience of managing dose in STEM along with interpreting three-dimensional information as a series of slices allowed Toby to develop the SBFSEM technology when it first arrived in Manchester in 2010.  Toby’s recent research has used a variety of techniques to generate multi-scale imaging of the same samples: targetting regions of interest via prior-X-ray imaging, correlative light and 3DEM, and correlative work across multiple EM techniques imaging from tissue organisation down to individual macro-molecules.

    • Nicole Schieber (EMBL, Heidelberg, DE)

      Talk Title: FIB-SEM workflows for aquatic organisms

      Nicole Schieber is lab manager in Yannick Schwab’s team at the EMBL, Heidelberg. She started there in 2013 after moving from The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Nicole graduated from UQ in 2007 with a Bachelor of Marine Biology and Ecology, where her honours project used electron microscopy (EM) to compare the ultrastructure of the retina across several Elasmobranch species. She then went on to specialise in EM at the Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis and within the group of Prof. Rob Parton, both at UQ. Currently, her research within the Schwab team is focused to develop, improve and implement strategies for correlative light and electron microscopy and for volume electron microscopy by serial SEM. Her work has impacted a number of research projects at EMBL involving numerous model systems, both uni- and multicellular. Nicole Schieber has also been very active in the organisation of courses and workshops around the themes of CLEM and volumeEM.


LSA.10: Recent Advances in Cellular Cryo-Electron Tomography

In recent years, cryo-EM has become an important technique to analyze the structure of molecules. Similarly important will be the implementation of these structures in the cellular context. In order to study cells in their native environment cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is the method of choice. In cryo-EM, the sample remains in a close-to-native state by rapid freezing of the EM grid, which turns the water in the sample into amorphous ice unlike in conventional EM where the sample is dehydrated and stained with heavy metals leading to artifacts. Cells can be grown on EM support films (grid) and e.g. pinched of nerve endings (synaptosomes) can directly be added to the EM grid, and with the addition of fluorescent markers samples can be imaged at a cryo-fluorescence microscope. The combination of these techniques, referred to as cryo light and electron microscopy (CLEM), allows for the localization of cellular structures, which can then be pinpointed with high structural resolution by cryo-ET. Additionally, time resolved approaches have been developed to image ongoing processes in the cell i.e. exocytosis in synaptosomes with millisecond resolution. Imaging spatiotemporal processes in their native state with high structural resolution is a challenging yet very important method for future research. In this session, we will introduce methodological advances and strategies that can be employed to cope with e.g. thick cells or a crowded cellular environment and show how cellular cryo-ET has recently resolved important biological questions.

Related Conference Theme/s: Cutting Edge Advanced Sample Preparation

Session Chairs and Invited Speakers
  • Session Chairs
    • JULIKA RADECKE (DIAMOND LIGHT SOURCE, UK)






       

       

    • BENOIT ZUBER (UNIVERSITY OF BERN, CH)

        After completing a Master in Molecular Biology at the University of Lausanne, Benoît Zuber obtained his PhD under the supervision of Jacques Dubochet in 2007. There he contributed to the development of cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS), a method that enables ultrastructural analysis of native tissues. He applied it to the study of synapses and, in parallel, he characterized the native structure mycobacteria cell envelope. He then moved to Cambridge, UK for a postdoc with Nigel Unwin at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and studied the molecular architecture of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and rapsyn clusters in Torpedo marmorata electric organ synapse, a model of the neuromuscular synapse. In 2011 he joined the Institute of Anatomy of the University of Bern as a junior lecturer and a year later he obtained an Professorship grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation. In 2017 he was promoted to Associate Professor of Anatomy and Structural Biology. His current research interests include the in situ structural and functional analysis of synapses, the structural basis of schizophrenia, and the molecular mechanism of pore forming proteins.

  • Invited Speakers
    • LU GAN (NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE, SG)

      Talk title: Exploration of eukaryotic nuclei in situ with cryo-ET

      Lu Gan received his B.S. at Caltech and his Ph.D. at The Scripps Research Institute. He did his postdoctoral research at Caltech. In 2011, started his lab at the National University of Singapore. Lu's lab is interested in the relationship between nuclear structure and function. His lab uses cryo-ET as a key tool, complemented with conventional cell-biology approaches, to study model yeasts. They have shown that the 3-D organization of chromatin is irregular at the nucleosome level throughout the cell cycle, in the presence and absence of compaction. This irregular chromatin is conducive to both high and low levels of transcription, which may be controlled by the level of and accessibility to large multi-megadalton complexes. In addition to chromatin, Lu's lab has investigated the structure of the chromosome-segregation machinery in situ. Their recent work showed that a major outer-kinetochore component has an in situ conformational state that is consistent with biased-diffusion-driven chromosome movement. In the course of these studies, Lu's lab has developed cryo-ET sample preparation and image-analysis workflows to deal with the densely packed macromolecular complexes inside cell nuclei.


LSA.11: CryoEM from Membrane Proteins to Large Complexes

1. Single-particle cryo-EM studies of membrane protein complexes: Membrane protein complexes are difficult samples to present optimally for single-particle cryo-EM studies with 3D reconstruction. Grids are typically prepared from detergent-solubilized samples or from samples based on lipid-based nanoparticles such as nanodiscs and saposin-lipid nanoparticles. Particular challenges are found in getting proper sampling of orientations, avoiding aggregation and denaturation at the air-water  interface. The symposium will highlight recent developments in rational approaches to studies of challenging membrane protein complexes.

2. Molecular mechanisms by high resolution cryo electron microscopy: Recent advances in cryoEM allowed the deciphering of complex mechanisms performed by large protein complexes. Examples of this new trend can be seen in top journals every week.

Related Conference Theme/s: Phase Sensitive Methods with Photons and Electrons

 


LSA.12: Application of EM in Health Industry

The session will describe the current efforts in the health industry to improve process development and product characterization using EM based technologies. The recent technological developments in EM have highlighted this technology as for consequence a great interest of the health industry. This technology thatw as mainly present in public laboratories is more and more present in-house in the industry. The recent technological developments opened the door to new possiblities in this field, as protein targets that have been forbidden for drug design due to lack of crystal structures may now become amenable for drug design but also epitope mapping for vaccine. Besides showing the current efforts in the area of 3D, the session will address also the possible applications of EM in health industry, the possible problems in the application of this new approach to drug design or vaccine development.

Related Conference Theme/s: Cutting Edge Advanced Sample Preparation

 



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